The Man Protecting Kenya's Coast Lines
       
     
       
     
 Ring net fishermen arrive at the Gazi landing site after a night of fishing. Boats can handle crews of up to 20. A big chunk of the profits goes to the boat and ring net owners. The remainder is split among the fishermen crew.
       
     
 At 6AM, hundreds of locals from Msambweni wade out to the ring net boats carrying plastic buckets to collect fish at the Gazi landing site.
       
     
 A bucket of sardines caught by ring net fishermen in Msambweni. 
       
     
 A ring net hangs off a boat at Gazi landing site in Msambweni. The holes between the meshing are illegal, because they are too small. They don't just catch the target fish species, they also scoop up juvenile fish, nests and eggs, impacting the sustainable life cycle.
       
     
 A local buying fish at the Gazi landing site in Msambweni. Although the target species was sardines, ring nets scoop up every species in their path. By-catch can include sea turtles, rays, and a range of other species.
       
     
 Hussein Ali Mwabori, 53, stands in front of his sailing boat which he uses to patrol the waters in Msambweni and confront illegal ring net fishermen.
       
     
The Man Protecting Kenya's Coast Lines
       
     
The Man Protecting Kenya's Coast Lines

Hussein Ali Mwabori, 53, a local fisherman turned activist against illegal ring net fishing. For 12 years, Ali has patrolled the waters in Msambweni day and night, confronting illegal fishermen. 

Reported for Al Jazeera English with Harriet Constable.

       
     
Video - Hussein Ali Mwabori

Meet Ali, a local fisherman on Kenya's coast who patrols the waters fearlessly to confront illegal fishing.

 Ring net fishermen arrive at the Gazi landing site after a night of fishing. Boats can handle crews of up to 20. A big chunk of the profits goes to the boat and ring net owners. The remainder is split among the fishermen crew.
       
     

Ring net fishermen arrive at the Gazi landing site after a night of fishing. Boats can handle crews of up to 20. A big chunk of the profits goes to the boat and ring net owners. The remainder is split among the fishermen crew.

 At 6AM, hundreds of locals from Msambweni wade out to the ring net boats carrying plastic buckets to collect fish at the Gazi landing site.
       
     

At 6AM, hundreds of locals from Msambweni wade out to the ring net boats carrying plastic buckets to collect fish at the Gazi landing site.

 A bucket of sardines caught by ring net fishermen in Msambweni. 
       
     

A bucket of sardines caught by ring net fishermen in Msambweni. 

 A ring net hangs off a boat at Gazi landing site in Msambweni. The holes between the meshing are illegal, because they are too small. They don't just catch the target fish species, they also scoop up juvenile fish, nests and eggs, impacting the sustainable life cycle.
       
     

A ring net hangs off a boat at Gazi landing site in Msambweni. The holes between the meshing are illegal, because they are too small. They don't just catch the target fish species, they also scoop up juvenile fish, nests and eggs, impacting the sustainable life cycle.

 A local buying fish at the Gazi landing site in Msambweni. Although the target species was sardines, ring nets scoop up every species in their path. By-catch can include sea turtles, rays, and a range of other species.
       
     

A local buying fish at the Gazi landing site in Msambweni. Although the target species was sardines, ring nets scoop up every species in their path. By-catch can include sea turtles, rays, and a range of other species.

 Hussein Ali Mwabori, 53, stands in front of his sailing boat which he uses to patrol the waters in Msambweni and confront illegal ring net fishermen.
       
     

Hussein Ali Mwabori, 53, stands in front of his sailing boat which he uses to patrol the waters in Msambweni and confront illegal ring net fishermen.